For the more information about the geologic resources of the National Park Service, please visit http://www.nature.nps.gov/geology/.


Geologic Hazards

Geologic Monitoring
Large boulder rockfall severely damaged this park housing at Zion National Park, Utah. There were no injuries.

Overview

The geologic processes that formed the spectacular landscapes of many national parks remain active today, and can be hazardous to park visitors, staff, infrastructure, and neighbors. Potentially hazardous processes include volcanic eruptions and other geothermal related features, earthquakes, landslides and other slope failures, mudflows, sinkhole collapses, snow avalanches, flooding, glacial surges and outburst floods, tsunamis, and shoreline movements. This site provides information on geologic hazards in U.S. National Parks and NPS Geologic Hazards Management.

What are Geologic Hazards?

Geohazards are any geological or hydrological process that poses a threat to people and/or their property. Every year severe natural events destroy infrastructure and cause injuries and even deaths.

Safety Recommendations

When you are planning your visit to a park site, take the time to learn about the geologic hazards that you may encounter. In areas of known hazards, there may be hazard maps available on the park's website or you can request information at the visitor center. It is recommended that you and your travel companions become familiar with the hazards, possible escape routes, first aid facilities, shelters, and emergency contacts for each area that you plan to visit.

Natural processes can cause hazardous conditions at any time, even in "safe" areas where no incidents have been observed previously. Always be observant of the conditions around you and be prepared to respond to hazardous situations that may arise.


Types of Geologic Hazards

Coastal

Coastal Learn more »

Fluvial

Fluvial

Glacial

Glacial

Upland/Landslide

Upland Learn more »

Aeolian

Aeolian

Volcanic/Geothermal

Glaciers

Seismic

Marine

Karst/Sinkhole

Paleontology

Soil Risks & Hazards

soil risks and hazards Learn more »

Mineral/Geochemical

Mineral/Geochemical Learn more »

Abandoned Mine

Slope Movements Learn more »

Oil/Gas Well

Oil/Gas Well Learn more »

Hurricane

Hurricane Learn more »

Flooding

Flooding

Avalanche

Slope Movements Learn more »

Tsunami

Tsunami Learn more »


 


Related Links

 


Key Contacts

Eric BilderbackEric Bilderback, PhD
Geologic Hazards & Disturbed Lands Program Lead
Geologic Resources Division
12795 West Alameda Parkway
Lakewood, Colorado 80228
(303) 969-2154 (office)
(720) 556-4406 (cell)
Contact - Eric Bilderback


Harold (Hal) PrangerHarold (Hal) Pranger
Geologic Features and Systems Branch Chief
Geologic Resources Division
12795 West Alameda Parkway
Lakewood, Colorado 80228
(303) 969-2018 (office)
Contact - Hal Pranger


Geologic Resources Division Mailing Address
National Park Service
Geologic Resources Division
P.O. Box 25287
Denver, Colorado 80225-0287


 

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Last Updated: December 10, 2013